GLOSS Identification Week Update

Identification week for GLOSS ended on 04 December. In total, facilities around the globe identified more than 2 700 women with signs of infection or sepsis.  The researchers are now following up with all hospitalized women until discharge. Results will be tabulated and shared in 2018.

GLOSS in action updates:

Benin

Cameroon

Egypt

Romania

South Africa

Sri Lanka

GLOSS Research Underway

Providers from about 500 facilities have been busy this week identifying eligible women for GLOSS, and have recruited over 2 000 women so far (still several hours more to go!). This is an extraordinary, collective effort. Want to see what the global coordination looks like on the map?

Thanks to a great campaign launched in all the facilities informing providers about the study and common identifying signs for maternal sepsis, everyone is ready to support GLOSS. Providers also helped in developing the campaign by telling us what they knew, how they felt about it, and what difficulties they faced when identifying and managing sepsis through a survey. Representatives of 47 countries completed over 1 000 surveys. The survey was available in eight languages, and 578 responded in Spanish, 272 in English, and 117 in Russian. The country with the most completed surveys was Guatemala, followed by Colombia, and then Lithuania. True champions in our awareness campaign activities!

Thanks to everyone who participated in the survey and in putting together this great campaign. The campaign aimed to raise provider awareness on maternal sepsis so that they could be in tune with identifying women with this condition.

More to come as identification week comes to a close.

 

“Sepsis en embarazo” video contributed by colleagues in Colombia

Our GLOSS colleagues María Fernanda Escobar and Javier Carvajal, together with Adriana Messa from Fundación Valle de Lili in Cali, Colombia have created a new video to showcase STOP SEPEIS campaign information about sepsis during pregnancy. The “Sepsis en embarazo” video is being shown on TV screens in the Fundación Valle del Lili during the data preparation and collection phases of the Global Maternal Sepsis Study. It is a wonderful demonstration of the campaign in action and an invaluable resource for healthcare practitioners and patients.

 

Note: video is available in Spanish language only.

Antibiotics: Handle with care

his week is World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, a WHO initiative to raise awareness for a serious public health threat: antimicrobial resistance (AMR).  Antibiotics are an important tool in effectively treating infections, including maternal and neonatal sepsis. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change in response to the use of these medicines. As a result, the medicines become ineffective and infections persist in the body, increasing the risk of spread to others.

 

To prevent and control the spread of antibiotic resistance, healthcare providers can:

  • Prevent infections by ensuring hands, instruments, and environment is clean.
  • Only prescribe and dispense antibiotics when they are needed, according to current guidelines.
  • Report antibiotic-resistant infections to surveillance teams.
  • Talk to patients about how to take antibiotics correctly, antibiotic resistance and the dangers of misuse.
  • Talk to patients about preventing infections (for example, vaccination, hand washing, safer sex, and covering nose and mouth when sneezing).

 

You can learn more about World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and download information and tools here.

WSC Spotlight: Neonatal Sepsis

Each year, sepsis kills more than 1 million newborns globally. Many factors contribute to the high number of neonatal deaths from infection, including under-recognition of illness, delay in care seeking by the family, and lack of access to quality health care services.

On 12 September 2017, the third session of the WSC Spotlight: Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis focused specifically on neonatal sepsis, including sociocultural issues, the burden of the disease and best practice for prevention and treatment.

We are pleased to share the full video for the WSC Spotlight session on neonatal sepsis here.

Note: To turn on subtitles in other languages, make sure you have selected CLOSED CAPTIONS on at the bottom right of the screen. Once that is selected, click on the wrench/settings icon and then click on SUBTITLES. Then select your preferred subtitle language

Speakers:

Chair: Shamim Qazi, WHO, Switzerland

Sepsis in Newborns — Broad Overview of Sociocultural Issues

Zulfiqar Bhutta, Hospital for Sick Children, Canada

Burden, Definition, and Post-Discharge Mortality

Niranjan Kissoon, Global Sepsis Alliance, Canada

Neonatal Sepsis — Prevention and Treatment

Steve Wall, Save the Children, United States

Treatment Where Referral Is Not Feasible

Samira Aboubaker, WHO, Switzerland

Clinical Signs of Sepsis in Neonates

Pierre Tissií¨res, Paris South University Hospital, France

Is There a Role for Biomarkers in Antibiotic Stewardship in Neonates Suspected of Early Onset Sepsis?

Annemarie van Rossum, Sophia Children‘s Hospital, Netherlands

 

You can access the full suite of materials shared at the WSC Spotlight: Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis on the WSC Youtube channel or via podcasts available in the Apple iTunes store. Please visit www.wscspotlight.org/schedule for the full release schedule.

 

WSC Spotlight: Maternal Sepsis

Every pregnant (or recently pregnant) woman is at risk of an infection that could trigger sepsis, a leading cause of death for women. WHO has developed a standardised definition of maternal and neonatal sepsis to bring it in line with the current understanding of sepsis in the adult population: “maternal sepsis is a life-threatening condition defined as organ dysfunction resulting from infection during pregnancy, childbirth, post-abortion, or postpartum period”.

On 12 September 2017, the second session of the WSC Spotlight: Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis focused specifically on the new WHO definition of maternal sepsis and current research, knowledge and initiatives to better understand maternal sepsis and how to best suspect, treat and prevent it.

We are pleased to share the full video for the WSC Spotlight session on maternal sepsis here.

Note: To turn on subtitles in other languages, make sure you have selected CLOSED CAPTIONS on at the bottom right of the screen. Once that is selected, click on the wrench/settings icon and then click on SUBTITLES. Then select your preferred subtitle language

Speakers:

Chair: Arri Coomarasamy, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

Maternal Sepsis — Challenges, Burden, Definition, and Identification

Joao Paulo Souza, WHO, Switzerland

Prevention and Management of Maternal Sepsis

David Lissauer, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

Management of Maternal Septic Shock

Maria Fernanda Escobar Vidarte, FIGO, Colombia

The Global Maternal Sepsis Study

Mercedes Bonet, WHO, Switzerland

Addressing Maternal Sepsis in LMIC

Jeffrey Smith, Jhpiego, United States

 

You can access the full suite of materials shared at the WSC Spotlight: Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis on the WSC Youtube channel or via podcasts available in the Apple iTunes store. Please visit www.wscspotlight.org/schedule for the full release schedule.